FireFold Blog

What is a Print Server?

When we want to connect multiple personal computers to a printer or we want to share a printer on a network, then we usually need a device referred to as a print server. Often a print server is just a computer with a number of computers shared on the network, but more often it is a dedicated device that is in itself a network device, but also connects to a number of printers.

The server acts as the interface between computer users requiring a printing service and the printers themselves. Sometimes the server is a feature or a service on another device such as a router or wireless access point. This is a good idea but does have a number of disadvantages, least of all the fact that the print server function is just another function on the router and it may not provide the same level of service as dedicated print servers do.

Most servers that provide facilities for print sharing usually have a management interface that can normally be accessed over the network itself. This interface will sometimes allow the administrator of the server to set up user permissions and to set up any specific operation of the device. A client can just use a particular printer when it has been approved using some verification technique.

At the point when various printers are being used, the server might be modified so that a few clients can just use specific printers whilst others may have consent to get to all printers. Having various printers joined to the print server can additionally give versatility in the occasion of a printer failing. The users can either be directed to use another printer or can manually select another printing device.

Wireless print server

With increased mobility of networking and wireless networking, having a wireless-enabled service makes a lot of sense. Users can use the print server direct from the wireless network, subject to the same authorization and authentication as required by a wired device. It also means that the wireless print server can be located almost anywhere, provided it is in the range of the network wireless access point or wireless router that is the hub of the network. The printers themselves will normally be connected to the wireless printing server via a USB Cable, which not only provides the connectivity but in some cases can also be used to power the printer.

Wireless print servers need to have system certifications, much the same as any other gadget in a remote wireless system. In that relation, SSID will be needed as well as any validation and encryption settings. Any customer personal computer will be obliged to have the printer programming installed to permit all print capacities to be accessible to it.

In conclusion, a good wireless print server should have a high-speed USB connection as well as a fast Ethernet connection. It should support scanning, faxing, and a printing function, being versatile in every aspect.